Thursday, January 28, 2016

The Hidden Meanings in Valentines

A Valentine has a visual language that sends a subtle message to the recipient.
 
antique valentine postcard post card with heart and dovesantique valentine postcard post card with heart, bird and flowersantique gold embossed valentine postcard post card with heart and flowers
Hearts are a symbol for love, affection, and romance or romantic adoration.
 
antique embossed valentine postcard post card with heart, bird, cherub and flowers antique gold embossed valentine postcard post card with heart, bird, and flowers
Doves are a symbol for romance.  In Greek mythology, Aphrodite, the goddess of love is often shown with a dove on her hand or doves circling her head. Doves mean everlasting love because the dove mates for life.
 
antique embossed valentine postcard post card with heart, doves and basket of flowers antique embossed valentine postcard post card with heart and roses
Red Roses are a  symbol for beauty  and love.  A favorite Valentine gift is a dozen roses.
 
antique embossed valentine postcard post card with heart, dove and pansy antique embossed valentine postcard post card with heart and pansy
Violets are a symbol for affection.
 

antique valentine postcard post card with beautiful lady heart and lilac
Lilac are a symbol to say, you are my one and only love.
 

antique embossed valentine postcard post card with lilly of the valley antique embossed valentine postcard post card with lilly of the valley and couple
Lilies of the Valley symbolizes sweetness and purity and they bring happiness.  They are considered a good luck charm.
 
antique embossed valentine postcard post card with cherub and heart antique embossed valentine postcard post card with cherub and heart
 Cupid and Cupid's arrows make you fall deeply in love.
 
antique glossy gel valentine postcard post card, pretty lady antique embossed valentine postcard post card, pretty lady, John Winsch
 A pretty lady symbolizes beauty and femininity.


Can you find the hidden message in this Valentine?
antique valentine postcard post card, heart, flowers, dove, message
This Valentine says:  We have  a romance.  I have love and affection for you.  You are my one and only love.
 

Sunday, January 10, 2016

You Should Go To......The Greentown Glass Museum

Greentown Glass Museum Front Door
Entrance to the Greentown Glass Museum
  If you love beautiful early American pattern glass and glass history, the Greentown Glass Museum has a wonderful display of glass made by the Indiana Tumbler and Goblet Company and the knowledgeable docents at the museum will give you an interesting history lesson.
  Greentown is a small town with a population of about 2300 people located about 9 miles east of Kokomo (another must see). A Native American Indian village existed on the site that is the town of Greentown today. In 1848, the people living in the area needed a trading post and they decided that Greentown was a good central location.  No one actually knows where the name Greentown came from, but several theories have been tossed about; the Native American chief was called Green,  the township was named Green Township, or maybe just because it’s a beautiful green area.

 

A Brief History of The Indiana Tumbler and Goblet Company

The residents of Greentown were interested in developing manufacturing in the area and there was a good supply of natural gas, workers, and investment money. Construction began in March, 1894 on The Indiana Tumbler and Goblet Company and the main factory was quickly completed. Glassmaking began in June, 1894. 

Indiana Tumbler and Goblet Company 1894
Indiana Tumbler and Goblet Company
The company was successful and expanded rapidly first making only crystal clear glass but by 1898 adding lovely colors of teal blue, opaque white, vaseline, cobalt blue, emerald green, and amber.  
 
Number 11 Ice Tea Tumber and Mold Greentown GlassMuseum
      Number 11 Iced Tea Tumbler and Mold       
EAPG Amber Dewey Cruet Greentown Glass
Amber Dewey Cruet

Greentown Glass Museum Display Case Museum
Display case at the Greentown Glass Museum showing cruet sets in different colors.

A talented glass chemist, Jacob Rosenthal, joined the company in 1900 and his new chocolate glass became a big hit in the glass market


Antique EAPG Chocolate Cactus pitcher
Chocolate Cactus Pitcher


Antique EAPG Chocolate Leaf Bracket Sauce Dish
Chocolate leaf Bracket Sauce Dish

He also developed an opaque green glass called Nile Green but he is probably most famous for his Golden Agate glass.  Today his unique and innovated glass is highly sought after by glass collectors and demand a fairly high price.

Antique EAPG Golden Agate or Holly Amber Toothpick Holder
Golden Agate or Holly Amber Toothpick Holder
Greentown Glass Museum Display Case
Display case showing Nile Green & Holly Amber
The Indiana Tumbler and Goblet Company burnt to the ground on a Saturday morning, June 13, 1903.  Although there were some attempts to rebuild the factory during the next couple of years, the idea was abandoned due to lawsuits, problems with the natural gas supply and lack of financial support. This company made beautiful glass for only nine years but today it is remember for its outstanding contribution to glass innovation and design.
 
Greentown Glass Museum Display Case
Greentown Glass Museum Display Case













 



 

 

 

 

Display cabinets showing patterns, colors and novelty pieces of Greentown glass.

 
The Greentown Glass Museum has preserved the glass and the history of the Indiana Tumbler and Goblet Company.  Today, the National Greentown Glass Association, www.greentownglass.org  is dedicated to preserving, collecting, educating, and disseminating information about the Indiana Tumbler and Goblet Company.  Every year in June, Greentown glass collectors meet to attend educational lectures, an auction, an antique show, and share their enthusiasm for Greentown glass with fellow collectors.    It's a great place to visit........you should go.

Wednesday, December 30, 2015

Happy New Year

May you be blessed with 
good health, 
good friends, 
and much happiness in 2016.

 
Reuzeit Emporium

Tuesday, December 15, 2015

Sunday, November 22, 2015

Thanksgiving Greeetings

Beautiful Antique Thanksgiving Postcards make great addition to your hostess gift. Share these special thoughtful messages with all your loved ones this year.
                                 
https://sites.google.com/a/reuzeitmn.com/reuzeitmn/post-cards/holiday/thanksgiving
 
Reuzeit Emporium wishes you a peaceful and happy Thanksgiving.

Tuesday, October 13, 2015

Wave Crest: Beautiful Opalware Glass

   Many people are confused when they see a decorated Wave Crest object. I have heard people say, "What is this?  Porcelain? Glass?  A collector will immediately identify a piece as Wave Crest but an inexperienced observer is often confused. 
  Wave Crest is glass.  It is opal ware glass that people sometimes call milk glass but it is not the normal everyday milk glass.  Most Wave Crest pieces are made in a mold and if you examine a piece you will be able to detect the mold lines. This thin transparent  opal ware glass was manufactured by many different glass houses including Mount Washington Pairpoint.  The undecorated glass called blanks was sold to decorating houses for embellishments.  C F Monroe was one of the largest and most well know of the decorating factories employing many skilled well known artists.

Two Sided Shell Shaker #351


Swirl and Bulge Shaker #72

Tulip Shaker #73
  As a first step in the decorating process, C F Monroe, often put these undecorated pieces into an acid bath with the result being a lusterless soft finish  called satin glass because the glass felt like satin to the touch. Only a  few pieces of Wave Crest have been found with an untouched shiny glossy finish. After the acid bath, many pieces were painted with a pastel matte finish, light blue, pink, yellow background and then the true splendor of Wave Crest began. The decorating!
Cracker Jar #352
white ground, hand painted
Cracker Jar #402
blue tinted ground, hand painted
Cracker Jar #404
pink tinted ground, hand painted
  Charles Monroe employed some of the best skilled artists, including Carl V. Helmschmied, Walter Nilson, J.J. Knoblauch, Joseph Hickish, Carl Puffee, Flora Fiest, Gustave Reinman, Florence Knoblauch, Emil Melchior, and Alma Wenk, Blanche Duval, Gussie Stremlan, Elizabeth Zeibart, and Elizabeth Casey.  These artists decorated the glass with a gradient degree of difficulty and design that C. F. Monroe sold by categories called assortments. 
Assortment 1: consisted of decorations on a white ground that was then glazed, this was the least expensive.  

https://sites.google.com/a/reuzeitmn.com/reuzeitmn/eapg/salt-pepper-sugar-shakers/salt-pepper-4
Bulbous Necklace Shaker

The shaker on the left is an exception, it was purchased as blank by the C.F. Monroe and decorated with an applied transfer of orange, blue, and brown flowers. Today, only a few pieces of glossy items have been recorded and because these items are rare, they often demand a fairly high price.  It is named Bulbous Necklace in Lechner's book, " The World of Salt Shakers, volume 2." 





Assortment 2: consisted of decorations on a tinted ground glaze.
Assortment 2 1/2:  consisted of decorations on a tinted ground with a fired bisque finish.
Assortment 3: consisted of decorations on a tinted ground glaze with more elaborate designs.
Assortment 4: consisted of decorations on a tinted ground with a bisque finish.
Assortment 5 consisted of decorations on a tinted ground with a bisque finish, the designs were traced in gold.

Assortment 6, consisted of decorations, traced in gold and were described as "very elegant and striking."
  Special order and totally hand painted pieces demanded the highest price and were the most time consuming to paint.  Transfers were used to lessen the cost and the time required to paint the items.  Sometimes both techniques were used on the same item, a transfer was applied first and then the artist would add a few hand painted dots, flowers, or scrolls. 
https://sites.google.com/a/reuzeitmn.com/reuzeitmn/lighting-1/lamps
Hand painted lamp base with
a house by a lake
https://sites.google.com/a/reuzeitmn.com/reuzeitmn/lighting-1/lamp-parts
Hand painted lamp base with
sailboats on a lake
https://sites.google.com/a/reuzeitmn.com/reuzeitmn/lighting-1/lamp-parts
Hand painted lamp base with
flowers
Draped Column Shakers #98
only tinted on bulbous base,
 glossy column
Wave Scroll Shakers #383
yellow tinted ground
 

https://sites.google.com/a/reuzeitmn.com/reuzeitmn/eapg/salt-pepper-sugar-shakers/salt-pepper-7---pair
 Shasta Daisy Shaker
flowers


  A trade advertisement states, "Wave Crest is the most wonderful  line ever put on the market. The trimmings are all 24 carat gold plate, and the finish and workmanship of the best, the decorations being hand painted and of numerous designs to meet the tastes of all." There was a very large assortment of Wave Crest items produced including vases, bowls, biscuit/cracker jars, pin dishes, salt and pepper shakers and jewelry boxes. Some of the rarer items include sugar sifters, napkin rings, paper weights, whisk broom holders, wig holders and lamps.  These pieces were made for everyday use and of course, over time many were broken or just thrown away.
Sugar Sifter #53 AA
white ground, hand painted
Jewel Box #425
pink ground, hand painted
Jewel Tray #424
yellow ground, hand painted
  Wave Crest pieces that were highly decorated and hand painted were most popular from 1890 to 1910 with C. F. Monroe at the forefront, being the largest producer of decorated opal ware.  However, demand for this type of glass began to wane and C. F. Monroe went out of business in 1916.  Today Wave Crest items demand a rather high price due to the limited supply and the beautiful decorations.
  In 1996, a group of collectors formed the, "Wave Crest Collectors Club," to study the wares decorated by the C. F. Monroe Company.  Check out their website: wavecrestcollectorsclub.org

 Below is an example of the same shaker pattern decorated with different finishes and flowers.

Sash Shaker
white background,
hand painted pink flowers


Sash Shaker
yellow background,
hand painted blue flowers

Blogging tips